PowerBI Dashboard Overview

Estimated read time – 5 min

We continue the series of materials on BI-systems and today we will have a look at the dashboard prepared in PowerBI using the SuperStore Sales dataset. We will cover how to connect the data to the system, set custom colors for visualizations and create new measures, implement switching between charts using bookmarks and we will discuss the challenges that we faced when building the dashboard.

This is the how the final dashboard looks like:

The most notable feature of the dashboard is data cards that show the company’s KPI. The cards compare the parameters to the same period in the previous year and show the previous year’s dynamics in the background.

Below we can see the chart that shows top-performing provinces. The bluer the rectangle the more profitable the province, the more orange the rectangle the more losses the province sustains. The size of the rectangle corresponds to the quantity of sales. We can click on rectangles to see more detailed information about profits and sales dynamics in the region on the graph on the left and their KPI at the top. On the graph, there are green and blue points that indicate the month of the current year and the previous year respectively. Hovering over these points, you can see a trend line.

The next part of the dashboard shows product and customer analysis. This part allows us to answer questions such as “which products were the most profitable or unprofitable” or “which customers contributed to most of the profits or most of the losses”.

Data collection

To connect the data we used an Excel file. PowerBI offers a number of sources to connect your data from such as Excel, csv, json files and various databases.

Configuring reports and visualizations

When building a dashboard in PowerBI we wanted to copy the color themes from Tableau. To do this, we have created a JSON file with the list of colors that we want to use. You can see the content of our file below. Then in the views tab, we clicked on the “browse for themes” button and uploaded our colors.

{
	"name":"Orange-Blue Diverging",
	"dataColors": [
		
		"#1c5998",
		"#1c73b1",
		"#3a87b7",
		"#67add4",
		"#7bc8e2",
		"#cacaca",
		"#fdab67",
		"#fd8938",
		"#f06511",
		"#d74401",
		"#a33202",
		"#7b3014",
		"#F07C28",
		"#2B5C8A",
		"#94C6E1",
		"#87d180",
	]
}

Then we have created a separate table called Calendar and populated it with all order dates. After that, we created a column with just a month and a year to create a filter based on it.

Creating necessary measures

When creating a dashboard with PowerBI we often need to create new measures. For the data cards, we created such measures as Total Profit, Total Sales, Total Orders, Total Clients and so on. The arrows that you can see in the data cards are also customized and a measure was created for each of them. To apply the color to arrows we formatted the color by rules and indicated red if the value is less than 0, green if the color is more than 0.

Adding bookmarks to switch between charts

To switch between charts, we added bookmarks for sales and profits. For the sales chart, the profits bookmark is hidden and vice versa. The button was downloaded from the internet and added to the respective bookmarks.

Interesting features and challenges we faced when building the dashboard

We have created custom data cards for KPI which are different from the default ones offered by PowerBI. The original features of cards include the background trend, the name and value while the arrows and changes are a custom feature. Another interesting feature that we used is cross filtration which allowed us to apply the filter to both the profits/sales chart and KPI cards.

One of the challenges that we have faced was the inability to build a bar chart with 2 categories. This feature was not implemented in PowerBI at the moment of writing this overview (maybe it is implemented now), so we had to create a table and add bar charts into it. Similarly, we inserted bar charts into the Top Customers table.

Conclusion

Our team has evaluated the dashboard and has given the following scores from 1-10 scale (10 being the highest) to this dashboard:

  1. Meets the tasks – 9.8
  2. Learning curve  – 3.0
  3. Tool functionality – 9.5
  4. Ease of use – 7.5
  5. Compliance with the layout – 9.5
  6. Visual evaluation – 8.8

Overall: 8.0 out of 10. Have a look at the final dashboard here.

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 19   1 mon   analysis   BI   BI-tools   powerbi
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