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Python and lyrics of Zemfira’s new album: capturing the spirit of her songs

Estimated read time – 16 min

Zemfira’s latest studio album, Borderline, was released in February, 8 years after the previous one. For this album, various people cooperated with her, including her relatives – the riff for the song “Таблетки” was written by her nephew from London. The album turned out to be diverse: for instance, the song “Остин” is dedicated to the main character of the Homescapes game by the Russian studio Playrix (by the way, check out the latest Business Secrets with the Bukhman brothers, they also mention it there). Zemfira liked the game a lot, thus, she contacted Playrix to create this song. Also, the song “Крым” was written as a soundtrack to a new film by Zemfira’s colleague Renata Litvinova.

Listen new album in Apple Music / Яндекс.Музыке / Spotify

Nevertheless, the spirit of the whole album is rather gloomy – the songs often repeat the words ‘боль’, ‘ад’, ‘бесишь’ and other synonyms. We decided to conduct an exploratory analysis of her album, and then, using the Word2Vec model and a cosine measure, look at the semantic closeness of the songs and calculate the general mood of the album.

For those who are bored with reading about data preparation and analysis steps, you can go directly to the results.

Data preparation

For starters, we write a data processing script. The purpose of the script is to collect a united csv-table from a set of text files, each of which contains a song. At the same time, we have to get rid of all punctuation marks and unnecessary words as we need to focus only on significant content.

import pandas as pd
import re
import string
import pymorphy2
from nltk.corpus import stopwords

Then we create a morphological analyzer and expand the list of everything that needs to be discarded:

morph = pymorphy2.MorphAnalyzer()
stopwords_list = stopwords.words('russian')
stopwords_list.extend(['куплет', 'это', 'я', 'мы', 'ты', 'припев', 'аутро', 'предприпев', 'lyrics', '1', '2', '3', 'то'])
string.punctuation += '—'

The names of the songs are given in English, so we have to create a dictionary for translation into Russian and a dictionary, from which we will later make a table:

result_dict = dict()

songs_dict = {
    'snow':'снег идёт',
    'crimea':'крым',
    'mother':'мама',
    'ostin':'остин',
    'abuse':'абьюз',
    'wait_for_me':'жди меня',
    'tom':'том',
    'come_on':'камон',
    'coat':'пальто',
    'this_summer':'этим летом',
    'ok':'ок',
    'pills':'таблетки'
}

Let’s define several necessary functions. The first one reads the entire song from the file and removes line breaks, the second clears the text from unnecessary characters and words, and the third one converts the words to normal form, using the pymorphy2 morphological analyzer. The pymorphy2 module does not always handle ambiguity well – additional processing is required for the words ‘ад’ and ‘рай’.

def read_song(filename):
    f = open(f'{filename}.txt', 'r').read()
    f = f.replace('\n', ' ')
    return f

def clean_string(text):
    text = re.split(' |:|\.|\(|\)|,|"|;|/|\n|\t|-|\?|\[|\]|!', text)
    text = ' '.join([word for word in text if word not in string.punctuation])
    text = text.lower()
    text = ' '.join([word for word in text.split() if word not in stopwords_list])
    return text

def string_to_normal_form(string):
    string_lst = string.split()
    for i in range(len(string_lst)):
        string_lst[i] = morph.parse(string_lst[i])[0].normal_form
        if (string_lst[i] == 'аду'):
            string_lst[i] = 'ад'
        if (string_lst[i] == 'рая'):
            string_lst[i] = 'рай'
    string = ' '.join(string_lst)
    return string

After all this preparation, we can get back to the data and process each song and read the file with the corresponding name:

name_list = []
text_list = []
for song, name in songs_dict.items():
    text = string_to_normal_form(clean_string(read_song(song)))
    name_list.append(name)
    text_list.append(text)

Then we combine everything into a DataFrame and save it as a csv-file.

df = pd.DataFrame()
df['name'] = name_list
df['text'] = text_list
df['time'] = [290, 220, 187, 270, 330, 196, 207, 188, 269, 189, 245, 244]
df.to_csv('borderline.csv', index=False)

Result:

Word cloud for the whole album

To begin with the analysis, we have to construct a word cloud, because it can display the most common words found in these songs. We import the required libraries, read the csv-file and set the configurations:

import nltk
from wordcloud import WordCloud
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from nltk import word_tokenize, ngrams

%matplotlib inline
nltk.download('punkt')
df = pd.read_csv('borderline.csv')

Now we create a new figure, set the design parameters and, using the word cloud library, display words with the size directly proportional to the frequency of the word. We additionally indicate the name of the song above the corresponding graph.

fig = plt.figure()
fig.patch.set_facecolor('white')
plt.subplots_adjust(wspace=0.3, hspace=0.2)
i = 1
for name, text in zip(df.name, df.text):
    tokens = word_tokenize(text)
    text_raw = " ".join(tokens)
    wordcloud = WordCloud(colormap='PuBu', background_color='white', contour_width=10).generate(text_raw)
    plt.subplot(4, 3, i, label=name,frame_on=True)
    plt.tick_params(labelsize=10)
    plt.imshow(wordcloud)
    plt.axis("off")
    plt.title(name,fontdict={'fontsize':7,'color':'grey'},y=0.93)
    plt.tick_params(labelsize=10)
    i += 1

EDA of the lyrics

Let us move to the next part and analyze the lyrics. To do this, we have to import special libraries to deal with data and visualization:

import plotly.graph_objects as go
import plotly.figure_factory as ff
from scipy import spatial
import collections
import pymorphy2
import gensim

morph = pymorphy2.MorphAnalyzer()

Firstly, we should count the overall number of words in each song, the number of unique words, and their percentage:

songs = []
total = []
uniq = []
percent = []

for song, text in zip(df.name, df.text):
    songs.append(song)
    total.append(len(text.split()))
    uniq.append(len(set(text.split())))
    percent.append(round(len(set(text.split())) / len(text.split()), 2) * 100)

All this information should be written in a DataFrame and additionally we want to count the number of words per minute for each song:

df_words = pd.DataFrame()
df_words['song'] = songs
df_words['total words'] = total
df_words['uniq words'] = uniq
df_words['percent'] = percent
df_words['time'] = df['time']
df_words['words per minute'] = round(total / (df['time'] // 60))
df_words = df_words[::-1]

It would be great to visualize the data, so let us build two bar charts: one for the number of words in the song, and the other one for the number of words per minute.

colors_1 = ['rgba(101,181,205,255)'] * 12
colors_2 = ['rgba(62,142,231,255)'] * 12

fig = go.Figure(data=[
    go.Bar(name='📝 Total number of words,
           text=df_words['total words'],
           textposition='auto',
           x=df_words.song,
           y=df_words['total words'],
           marker_color=colors_1,
           marker=dict(line=dict(width=0)),),
    go.Bar(name='🌀 Unique words',
           text=df_words['uniq words'].astype(str) + '<br>'+ df_words.percent.astype(int).astype(str) + '%' ,
           textposition='inside',
           x=df_words.song,
           y=df_words['uniq words'],
           textfont_color='white',
           marker_color=colors_2,
           marker=dict(line=dict(width=0)),),
])

fig.update_layout(barmode='group')

fig.update_layout(
    title = 
        {'text':'<b>The ratio of the number of unique words to the total</b><br><span style="color:#666666"></span>'},
    showlegend = True,
    height=650,
    font={
        'family':'Open Sans, light',
        'color':'black',
        'size':14
    },
    plot_bgcolor='rgba(0,0,0,0)',
)
fig.update_layout(legend=dict(
    yanchor="top",
    xanchor="right",
))

fig.show()
colors_1 = ['rgba(101,181,205,255)'] * 12
colors_2 = ['rgba(238,85,59,255)'] * 12

fig = go.Figure(data=[
    go.Bar(name='⏱️ Track length, min.',
           text=round(df_words['time'] / 60, 1),
           textposition='auto',
           x=df_words.song,
           y=-df_words['time'] // 60,
           marker_color=colors_1,
           marker=dict(line=dict(width=0)),
          ),
    go.Bar(name='🔄 Words per minute',
           text=df_words['words per minute'],
           textposition='auto',
           x=df_words.song,
           y=df_words['words per minute'],
           marker_color=colors_2,
           textfont_color='white',
           marker=dict(line=dict(width=0)),
          ),
])

fig.update_layout(barmode='overlay')

fig.update_layout(
    title = 
        {'text':'<b>Track length and words per minute</b><br><span style="color:#666666"></span>'},
    showlegend = True,
    height=650,
    font={
        'family':'Open Sans, light',
        'color':'black',
        'size':14
    },
    plot_bgcolor='rgba(0,0,0,0)'
)


fig.show()

Working with Word2Vec model

Using the gensim module, load the model pointing to a binary file:

model = gensim.models.KeyedVectors.load_word2vec_format('model.bin', binary=True)

Для материала мы использовали готовую обученную на Национальном Корпусе Русского Языка модель от сообщества RusVectōrēs

The Word2Vec model is based on neural networks and allows you to represent words in the form of vectors, taking into account the semantic component. It means that if we take two words – for instance, “mom” and “dad”, then represent them as two vectors and calculate the cosine, the values ​​will be close to 1. Similarly, two words that have nothing in common in their meaning have a cosine measure close to 0.

Now we will define the get_vector function: it will take a list of words, recognize a part of speech for each word, and then receive and summarize vectors, so that we can find vectors even for whole sentences and texts.

def get_vector(word_list):
    vector = 0
    for word in word_list:
        pos = morph.parse(word)[0].tag.POS
        if pos == 'INFN':
            pos = 'VERB'
        if pos in ['ADJF', 'PRCL', 'ADVB', 'NPRO']:
            pos = 'NOUN'
        if word and pos:
            try:
                word_pos = word + '_' + pos
                this_vector = model.word_vec(word_pos)
                vector += this_vector
            except KeyError:
                continue
    return vector

For each song, find a vector and select the corresponding column in the DataFrame:

vec_list = []
for word in df['text']:
    vec_list.append(get_vector(word.split()))
df['vector'] = vec_list

So, now we should compare these vectors with one another, calculating their cosine proximity. Those songs with a cosine metric higher than 0.5 will be saved separately – this way we will get the closest pairs of songs. We will write the information about the comparison of vectors into the two-dimensional list result.

similar = dict()
result = []
for song_1, vector_1 in zip(df.name, df.vector):
    sub_list = []
    for song_2, vector_2 in zip(df.name.iloc[::-1], df.vector.iloc[::-1]):
        res = 1 - spatial.distance.cosine(vector_1, vector_2)
        if res > 0.5 and song_1 != song_2 and (song_1 + ' / ' + song_2 not in similar.keys() and song_2 + ' / ' + song_1 not in similar.keys()):
            similar[song_1 + ' / ' + song_2] = round(res, 2)
        sub_list.append(round(res, 2))
    result.append(sub_list)

Moreover, we can construct the same bar chart:

df_top_sim = pd.DataFrame()
df_top_sim['name'] = list(similar.keys())
df_top_sim['value'] = list(similar.values())
df_top_sim.sort_values(by='value', ascending=False)

И построим такой же bar chart:

colors = ['rgba(101,181,205,255)'] * 5

fig = go.Figure([go.Bar(x=df_top_sim['name'],
                        y=df_top_sim['value'],
                        marker_color=colors,
                        width=[0.4,0.4,0.4,0.4,0.4],
                        text=df_top_sim['value'],
                        textfont_color='white',
                        textposition='auto')])

fig.update_layout(
    title = 
        {'text':'<b>Топ-5 closest songs</b><br><span style="color:#666666"></span>'},
    showlegend = False,
    height=650,
    font={
        'family':'Open Sans, light',
        'color':'black',
        'size':14
    },
    plot_bgcolor='rgba(0,0,0,0)',
    xaxis={'categoryorder':'total descending'}
)

fig.show()

Given the vector of each song, let us calculate the vector of the entire album – add the vectors of the songs. Then, for such a vector, using the model, we get the words that are the closest in spirit and meaning.

def get_word_from_tlist(lst):
    for word in lst:
        word = word[0].split('_')[0]
        print(word, end=' ')

vec_sum = 0
for vec in df.vector:
    vec_sum += vec
sim_word = model.similar_by_vector(vec_sum)
get_word_from_tlist(sim_word)

небо тоска тьма пламень плакать горе печаль сердце солнце мрак

This is probably the key result and the description of Zemfira’s album in just 10 words.

Finally, we build a general heat map, each cell of which is the result of comparing the texts of two tracks with a cosine measure.

colorscale=[[0.0, "rgba(255,255,255,255)"],
            [0.1, "rgba(229,232,237,255)"],
            [0.2, "rgba(216,222,232,255)"],
            [0.3, "rgba(205,214,228,255)"],
            [0.4, "rgba(182,195,218,255)"],
            [0.5, "rgba(159,178,209,255)"],
            [0.6, "rgba(137,161,200,255)"],
            [0.7, "rgba(107,137,188,255)"],
            [0.8, "rgba(96,129,184,255)"],
            [1.0, "rgba(76,114,176,255)"]]

font_colors = ['black']
x = list(df.name.iloc[::-1])
y = list(df.name)
fig = ff.create_annotated_heatmap(result, x=x, y=y, colorscale=colorscale, font_colors=font_colors)
fig.show()

Results and data interpretation

To give valuable conclusions, we would like to take another look at everything we got. First of all, let us focus on the word cloud. It is easy to see that the words ‘боль’, ‘невозможно’, ‘сорваться’, ‘растерзаны’, ‘сложно’, ‘терпеть’, ‘любить’ have a very decent size, because such words are often found throughout the entire lyrics:

Давайте ещё раз посмотрим на всё, что у нас получилось — начнём с облака слов. Нетрудно заметить, что у слов «боль», «невозможно», «сорваться», «растерзаны», «сложно», «терпеть», «любить» размер весьма приличный — всё потому, что такие слова встречаются часто на протяжении всего текста песен:

The song “Крым” turned out to be one of the most diverse songs – it contains 74% of unique words. Also, the song “Снег идет” contains very few words, so the majority, which is 82%, are unique. The largest song on the album in terms of amount of words is the track “Таблетки” – there are about 150 words in total.

As it was shown on the last chart, the most dynamic track is “Таблетки”, as much as 37 words per minute – nearly one word for every two seconds – and the longest track is “Абьюз”, and according to the previous chart, it also has the lowest percentage of unique words – 46%.

Top 5 most semantically similar text pairs:

We also got the vector of the entire album and found the closest words. Just take a look at them – ‘тьма’, ‘тоска’, ‘плакать’, ‘горе’, ‘печаль’, ‘сердце’ – this is the list of words that characterizes Zemfira’s lyrics!

небо тоска тьма пламень плакать горе печаль сердце солнце мрак

The final result is a heat map. From the visualization, it is noticeable that almost all songs are quite similar to each other – the cosine measure for many pairs exceeds the value of 0.4.

Conclusions

In the material, we carried out an EDA of the entire text of the new album and, using the pre-trained Word2Vec model, we proved the hypothesis – most of the “Borderline” songs are permeated with rather dark lyrics. However, this is normal, because we love Zemfira precisely for her sincerity and straightforwardness.

 No comments    63   1 mon   analysis   Analytics engineering   data analytics   plotly   python

How to build Animated Charts like Hans Rosling in Plotly

Estimated read time – 12 min

Hans Rosling’s work on world countries economic growth presented in 2007 at TEDTalks can be attributed to one of the most iconic data visualizations, ever created. Just check out this video, in case you don’t know what we’re talking about:

Sometimes we want to compare standards of living in other countries. One way to do this is to refer to the Big Mac index, which the Economist magazine has kept track of since 1986. The key idea this index represents is to measure purchasing power parity (PPP) in different countries, considering costs of domestic production. To make a standard burger, one would need the following ingredients: cheese, meat, bread and vegetables. Considering that all these ingredients can be produced locally, we can compare the production cost of one Big Mac in different countries, and measure purchasing power. Plus, McDonald’s is the world’s most popular franchise network, its restaurants are almost everywhere around the globe.

In today’s material, we will build a Motion Chart for the Big Mac index using Plotly. Following Hann Rosling’s idea, the chart will display country population along the X-axis and GDP per capita in US dollars along the Y. The size of the dots is going to be proportional to the Big Mac Index for a given country. And the color of the dots will represent the continent where the country is located.

Preparing Data

Even though The Economist has been updating it for over 30 years and sharing its observations publicly, the dataset contains many missing values. It also lacks continents names, but we can handle it by supplementing the data with some more datasets that can be found in our repo.

Let’s start by importing the libraries:

import pandas as pd
from pandas.errors import ParserError
import plotly.graph_objects as go
import numpy as np
import requests
import io

We can access the dataset directly from GitHub. Just use the following function to send a GET request to a CSV file and create a Pandas DataFrame. However, in some cases, this may raise a  ParseError because of the caption title, so we will add a try block:

def read_raw_file(link):
    raw_csv = requests.get(link).content
    try:
        df = pd.read_csv(io.StringIO(raw_csv.decode('utf-8')))
    except ParserError:
        df = pd.read_csv(io.StringIO(raw_csv.decode('utf-8')), skiprows=3)
    return df

bigmac_df = read_raw_file('https://github.com/valiotti/leftjoin/raw/master/motion-chart-big-mac/big-mac.csv')
population_df = read_raw_file('https://github.com/valiotti/leftjoin/raw/master/motion-chart-big-mac/population.csv')
dgp_df = read_raw_file('https://github.com/valiotti/leftjoin/raw/master/motion-chart-big-mac/gdp.csv')
continents_df = read_raw_file('https://github.com/valiotti/leftjoin/raw/master/motion-chart-big-mac/continents.csv')

From The Economist dataset we will need these columns: country name, local price, dollar exchange rate, country code (iso_a3) and record date. Take the timeline from 2005 to 2020, as the records are most complete for this span. And divide the local price by the exchange rate to calculate the price of one Big Mac in US dollars.

bigmac_df = bigmac_df[['name', 'local_price', 'dollar_ex', 'iso_a3', 'date']]
bigmac_df = bigmac_df[bigmac_df['date'] >= '2005-01-01']
bigmac_df = bigmac_df[bigmac_df['date'] < '2020-01-01']
bigmac_df['date'] = pd.DatetimeIndex(bigmac_df['date']).year
bigmac_df = bigmac_df.drop_duplicates(['date', 'name'])
bigmac_df = bigmac_df.reset_index(drop=True)
bigmac_df['dollar_price'] = bigmac_df['local_price'] / bigmac_df['dollar_ex']

Take a look at the result:

Next, let’s try adding a new column called continents. To ease the task, leave only two columns containing country code and continent name. Then we need to iterate through the bigmac_df[‘iso_a3’] column, adding a continent name for the corresponding values. However some cases may raise an error, because it’s not really clear, whether a country belongs to Europe or Asia, we will consider such cases as Europe by default.

continents_df = continents_df[['Continent_Name', 'Three_Letter_Country_Code']]
continents_list = []
for country in bigmac_df['iso_a3']:
    try:
        continents_list.append(continents_df.loc[continents_df['Three_Letter_Country_Code'] == country]['Continent_Name'].item())
    except ValueError:
        continents_list.append('Europe')
bigmac_df['continent'] = continents_list

Now we can drop unnecessary columns, apply sorting by country names and date, convert values in the date column into integers, and view the current result:

bigmac_df = bigmac_df.drop(['local_price', 'iso_a3', 'dollar_ex'], axis=1)
bigmac_df = bigmac_df.sort_values(by=['name', 'date'])
bigmac_df['date'] = bigmac_df['date'].astype(int)

Then we need to fill up missing values for The Big Mac index with zeros and remove the Republic of China, since this partially recognized state is not included in the World Bank datasets. The UAE occurs several times, this can lead to issues.

countries_list = list(bigmac_df['name'].unique())
years_set = {i for i in range(2005, 2020)}
for country in countries_list:
    if len(bigmac_df[bigmac_df['name'] == country]) < 15:
        this_continent = bigmac_df[bigmac_df['name'] == country].continent.iloc[0]
        years_of_country = set(bigmac_df[bigmac_df['name'] == country]['date'])
        diff = years_set - years_of_country
        dict_to_df = pd.DataFrame({
                      'name':[country] * len(diff),
                      'date':list(diff),
                      'dollar_price':[0] * len(diff),
                      'continent': [this_continent] * len(diff)
                     })
        bigmac_df = bigmac_df.append(dict_to_df)
bigmac_df = bigmac_df[bigmac_df['name'] != 'Taiwan']
bigmac_df = bigmac_df[bigmac_df['name'] != 'United Arab Emirates']

Next, let’s augment the data with GDP per capita and population from other datasets. Both datasets have differences in country names, so we need to specify such cases explicitly and replace them.

years = [str(i) for i in range(2005, 2020)]

countries_replace_dict = {
    'Russian Federation': 'Russia',
    'Egypt, Arab Rep.': 'Egypt',
    'Hong Kong SAR, China': 'Hong Kong',
    'United Kingdom': 'Britain',
    'Korea, Rep.': 'South Korea',
    'United Arab Emirates': 'UAE',
    'Venezuela, RB': 'Venezuela'
}
for key, value in countries_replace_dict.items():
    population_df['Country Name'] = population_df['Country Name'].replace(key, value)
    gdp_df['Country Name'] = gdp_df['Country Name'].replace(key, value)

Finally, extract population data and GDP for the given years, adding the data to the bigmac_df DataFrame:

countries_list = list(bigmac_df['name'].unique())

population_list = []
gdp_list = []
for country in countries_list:
    population_for_country_df = population_df[population_df['Country Name'] == country][years]
    population_list.extend(list(population_for_country_df.values[0]))
    gdp_for_country_df = gdp_df[gdp_df['Country Name'] == country][years]
    gdp_list.extend(list(gdp_for_country_df.values[0]))
    
bigmac_df['population'] = population_list
bigmac_df['gdp'] = gdp_list
bigmac_df['gdp_per_capita'] = bigmac_df['gdp'] / bigmac_df['population']

And here is our final dataset:

Creating a chart in Plotly

The population in China or India, on average, is 10 times more than in other countries. That’s why we need to transform X-axis to Log Scale, to make the chart easier for interpreting. The log-transformation is a common way to address skewness in data.

fig_dict = {
    "data": [],
    "layout": {},
    "frames": []
}

fig_dict["layout"]["xaxis"] = {"title": "Population", "type": "log"}
fig_dict["layout"]["yaxis"] = {"title": "GDP per capita (in $)", "range":[-10000, 120000]}
fig_dict["layout"]["hovermode"] = "closest"
fig_dict["layout"]["updatemenus"] = [
    {
        "buttons": [
            {
                "args": [None, {"frame": {"duration": 500, "redraw": False},
                                "fromcurrent": True, "transition": {"duration": 300,
                                                                    "easing": "quadratic-in-out"}}],
                "label": "Play",
                "method": "animate"
            },
            {
                "args": [[None], {"frame": {"duration": 0, "redraw": False},
                                  "mode": "immediate",
                                  "transition": {"duration": 0}}],
                "label": "Pause",
                "method": "animate"
            }
        ],
        "direction": "left",
        "pad": {"r": 10, "t": 87},
        "showactive": False,
        "type": "buttons",
        "x": 0.1,
        "xanchor": "right",
        "y": 0,
        "yanchor": "top"
    }
]

We will also add a slider to filter data within a certain range:

sliders_dict = {
    "active": 0,
    "yanchor": "top",
    "xanchor": "left",
    "currentvalue": {
        "font": {"size": 20},
        "prefix": "Year: ",
        "visible": True,
        "xanchor": "right"
    },
    "transition": {"duration": 300, "easing": "cubic-in-out"},
    "pad": {"b": 10, "t": 50},
    "len": 0.9,
    "x": 0.1,
    "y": 0,
    "steps": []
}

By default, the chart will display data for 2005 before we click on the “Play” button.

continents_list_from_df = list(bigmac_df['continent'].unique())
year = 2005
for continent in continents_list_from_df:
    dataset_by_year = bigmac_df[bigmac_df["date"] == year]
    dataset_by_year_and_cont = dataset_by_year[dataset_by_year["continent"] == continent]
    
    data_dict = {
        "x": dataset_by_year_and_cont["population"],
        "y": dataset_by_year_and_cont["gdp_per_capita"],
        "mode": "markers",
        "text": dataset_by_year_and_cont["name"],
        "marker": {
            "sizemode": "area",
            "sizeref": 200000,
            "size":  np.array(dataset_by_year_and_cont["dollar_price"]) * 20000000
        },
        "name": continent,
        "customdata": np.array(dataset_by_year_and_cont["dollar_price"]).round(1),
        "hovertemplate": '<b>%{text}</b>' + '<br>' +
                         'GDP per capita: %{y}' + '<br>' +
                         'Population: %{x}' + '<br>' +
                         'Big Mac price: %{customdata}$' +
                         '<extra></extra>'
    }
    fig_dict["data"].append(data_dict)

Next, we need to fill up the frames field, which will be used for animating the data. Each frame represents a certain data point from 2005 to 2019.

for year in years:
    frame = {"data": [], "name": str(year)}
    for continent in continents_list_from_df:
        dataset_by_year = bigmac_df[bigmac_df["date"] == int(year)]
        dataset_by_year_and_cont = dataset_by_year[dataset_by_year["continent"] == continent]

        data_dict = {
            "x": list(dataset_by_year_and_cont["population"]),
            "y": list(dataset_by_year_and_cont["gdp_per_capita"]),
            "mode": "markers",
            "text": list(dataset_by_year_and_cont["name"]),
            "marker": {
                "sizemode": "area",
                "sizeref": 200000,
                "size": np.array(dataset_by_year_and_cont["dollar_price"]) * 20000000
            },
            "name": continent,
            "customdata": np.array(dataset_by_year_and_cont["dollar_price"]).round(1),
            "hovertemplate": '<b>%{text}</b>' + '<br>' +
                             'GDP per capita: %{y}' + '<br>' +
                             'Population: %{x}' + '<br>' +
                             'Big Mac price: %{customdata}$' +
                             '<extra></extra>'
        }
        frame["data"].append(data_dict)

    fig_dict["frames"].append(frame)
    slider_step = {"args": [
        [year],
        {"frame": {"duration": 300, "redraw": False},
         "mode": "immediate",
         "transition": {"duration": 300}}
    ],
        "label": year,
        "method": "animate"}
    sliders_dict["steps"].append(slider_step)

Just a few finishing touches left, instantiate the chart, set colors, fonts and title.

fig_dict["layout"]["sliders"] = [sliders_dict]

fig = go.Figure(fig_dict)

fig.update_layout(
    title = 
        {'text':'<b>Motion chart</b><br><span style="color:#666666">The Big Mac index from 2005 to 2019</span>'},
    font={
        'family':'Open Sans, light',
        'color':'black',
        'size':14
    },
    plot_bgcolor='rgba(0,0,0,0)'
)
fig.update_yaxes(nticks=4)
fig.update_xaxes(tickfont=dict(family='Open Sans, light', color='black', size=12), nticks=4, gridcolor='lightgray', gridwidth=0.5)
fig.update_yaxes(tickfont=dict(family='Open Sans, light', color='black', size=12), nticks=4, gridcolor='lightgray', gridwidth=0.5)

fig.show()

Bingo! The Motion Chart is done:

View the code on GitHub

 No comments    326   12 mon   Analytics engineering   data analytics   plotly

How to build a dashboard with Bootstrap 4 from scratch (Part 2)

Estimated read time – 12 min

Previously we shared how to use Bootstrap components in building dashboard layout and designed a simple yet flexible dashboard with a scatter plot and Russian map. In today’s material, we will continue adding more information, explore how to make Bootstrap tables responsive, and cover some complex callbacks for data acquisition.

Constructing Data Tables

All the code for populating our tables with data will be stored in get_tables.py , while the layout components areoutlined in  application.py. This article will cover the process of creating the table with top Russian Breweries, however, you can find the code for creating the other three on Github.

Data in the Top Breweries table can be filtered by city name in the dropdown menu, but the data collected in Untappd is not equally structured. Some city names are written in Latin, others in Cyrillic. So the challenge is to make the names equal for SQL queries, and here is where Google Translate comes to the rescue. Though we sill have to manually create a dictionary of city names, since for example “Москва” can be written as “Moskva” and not “Moscow”. This dictionary will be used later for mapping our DataFrame before transforming it into a Bootstrap table.

import pandas as pd
import dash_bootstrap_components as dbc
from clickhouse_driver import Client
import numpy as np
from googletrans import Translator

translator = Translator()

client = Client(host='12.34.56.78', user='default', password='', port='9000', database='')

city_names = {
   'Moskva': 'Москва',
   'Moscow': 'Москва',
   'СПБ': 'Санкт-Петербург',
   'Saint Petersburg': 'Санкт-Петербург',
   'St Petersburg': 'Санкт-Петербург',
   'Nizhnij Novgorod': 'Нижний Новгород',
   'Tula': 'Тула',
   'Nizhniy Novgorod': 'Нижний Новгород',
}

Top Breweries Table

This table displays top 10 Russian breweries and their position change according to the rating. Simply put, we need to compare data for two periods, that’s [30 days ago; today] and [60 days ago; 30 days ago]. With this in mind, we will need the following headers: ranking, brewery name, position change, and number of check-ins.
Create the  get_top_russian_breweries function that would make queries to the Clickhouse DB, sort the data and return a refined Pandas DataFrame. Let’s send the following queries to obtain data for the past 30 and 60 days, ordering the results by the number of check-ins.


Querying data from the Database

def get_top_russian_breweries(checkins_n=250):
   top_n_brewery_today = client.execute(f'''
      SELECT  rt.brewery_id,
              rt.brewery_name,
              beer_pure_average_mult_count/count_for_that_brewery as avg_rating,
              count_for_that_brewery as checkins FROM (
      SELECT           
              brewery_id,
              dictGet('breweries', 'brewery_name', toUInt64(brewery_id)) as brewery_name,
              sum(rating_score) AS beer_pure_average_mult_count,
              count(rating_score) AS count_for_that_brewery
          FROM beer_reviews t1
          ANY LEFT JOIN venues AS t2 ON t1.venue_id = t2.venue_id
          WHERE isNotNull(venue_id) AND (created_at >= (today() - 30)) AND (venue_country = 'Россия') 
          GROUP BY           
              brewery_id,
              brewery_name) rt
      WHERE (checkins>={checkins_n})
      ORDER BY avg_rating DESC
      LIMIT 10
      '''
   )

top_n_brewery_n_days = client.execute(f'''
  SELECT  rt.brewery_id,
          rt.brewery_name,
          beer_pure_average_mult_count/count_for_that_brewery as avg_rating,
          count_for_that_brewery as checkins FROM (
  SELECT           
          brewery_id,
          dictGet('breweries', 'brewery_name', toUInt64(brewery_id)) as brewery_name,
          sum(rating_score) AS beer_pure_average_mult_count,
          count(rating_score) AS count_for_that_brewery
      FROM beer_reviews t1
      ANY LEFT JOIN venues AS t2 ON t1.venue_id = t2.venue_id
      WHERE isNotNull(venue_id) AND (created_at >= (today() - 60) AND created_at <= (today() - 30)) AND (venue_country = 'Россия')
      GROUP BY           
          brewery_id,
          brewery_name) rt
  WHERE (checkins>={checkins_n})
  ORDER BY avg_rating DESC
  LIMIT 10
  '''
)

Creating two DataFrames with the received data:

top_n = len(top_n_brewery_today)
column_names = ['brewery_id', 'brewery_name', 'avg_rating', 'checkins']

top_n_brewery_today_df = pd.DataFrame(top_n_brewery_today, columns=column_names).replace(np.nan, 0)
top_n_brewery_today_df['brewery_pure_average'] = round(top_n_brewery_today_df.avg_rating, 2)
top_n_brewery_today_df['brewery_rank'] = list(range(1, top_n + 1))

top_n_brewery_n_days = pd.DataFrame(top_n_brewery_n_days, columns=column_names).replace(np.nan, 0)
top_n_brewery_n_days['brewery_pure_average'] = round(top_n_brewery_n_days.avg_rating, 2)
top_n_brewery_n_days['brewery_rank'] = list(range(1, len(top_n_brewery_n_days) + 1))

And then calculate the position change over the period of time for each brewery received. With the try-except block, we will handle exceptions, in case, if a brewery was not yet in our database 60 days ago.

rank_was_list = []
for brewery_id in top_n_brewery_today_df.brewery_id:
   try:
       rank_was_list.append(
           top_n_brewery_n_days[top_n_brewery_n_days.brewery_id == brewery_id].brewery_rank.item())
   except ValueError:
       rank_was_list.append('–')
top_n_brewery_today_df['rank_was'] = rank_was_list

Now we iterate over the columns with current and former positions. If there is no hyphen contained in, we will append an up or down arrow depending on the change.

diff_rank_list = []
for rank_was, rank_now in zip(top_n_brewery_today_df['rank_was'], top_n_brewery_today_df['brewery_rank']):
   if rank_was != '–':
       difference = rank_was - rank_now
       if difference > 0:
           diff_rank_list.append(f'↑ +{difference}')
       elif difference < 0:
           diff_rank_list.append(f'↓ {difference}')
       else:
           diff_rank_list.append('–')
   else:
       diff_rank_list.append(rank_was)

Finally, replace DataFrame headers, inserting the column with current ranking positions, where the top 3 will be displayed with the trophy emoji.

df = top_n_brewery_today_df[['brewery_name', 'avg_rating', 'checkins']].round(2)
df.insert(2, 'Position change', diff_rank_list)
df.columns = ['NAME', 'RATING', 'POSITION CHANGE', 'CHECK-INS']
df.insert(0, 'RANKING', list('🏆 ' + str(i) if i in [1, 2, 3] else str(i) for i in range(1, len(df) + 1)))

return df

Filtering data by city name

One of the main tasks we set before creating this dashboard was to find out what are the most liked breweries in a certain city. The user chooses a city in the dropdown menu and gets the results. Sound pretty simple, but is it that easy?
Our next step is to write a script that would update data for each city and store it in separate CSV files. As we mentioned earlier, the city names are not equally structured, so we need to use Google Translator within the if-else block, and since it may not convert some names to Cyrillic we need to explicitly specify such cases:

en_city = venue_city
if en_city == 'Nizhnij Novgorod':
      ru_city = 'Нижний Новгород'
elif en_city == 'Perm':
      ru_city = 'Пермь'
elif en_city == 'Sergiev Posad':
      ru_city = 'Сергиев Посад'
elif en_city == 'Vladimir':
      ru_city = 'Владимир'
elif en_city == 'Yaroslavl':
      ru_city = 'Ярославль'
else:
      ru_city = translator.translate(en_city, dest='ru').text

Then we need to add both city names in English and Russian to the SQL query, to receive all check-ins sent from this city.

WHERE (rt.venue_city='{ru_city}' OR rt.venue_city='{en_city}')

Finally, we export received data into a CSV file in the following directory – data/cities.

df = top_n_brewery_today_df[['brewery_name', 'venue_city', 'avg_rating', 'checkins']].round(2)
df.insert(3, 'Position Change', diff_rank_list)
df.columns = ['NAME', 'CITY', 'RATING', 'POSITION CHANGE', 'CHECK-INS']
# MAPPING
df['CITY'] = df['CITY'].map(lambda x: city_names[x] if (x in city_names) else x)
# TRANSLATING
df['CITY'] = df['CITY'].map(lambda x: translator.translate(x, dest='en').text)
df.to_csv(f'data/cities/{en_city}.csv', index=False)
print(f'{en_city}.csv updated!')

Scheduling Updates

We will use the apscheduler library to automatically run the script and refresh data for each city in all_cities every day at 10:30 am (UTC).

from apscheduler.schedulers.background import BackgroundScheduler
from get_tables import update_best_breweries

all_cities = sorted(['Vladimir', 'Voronezh', 'Ekaterinburg', 'Kazan', 'Red Pakhra', 'Krasnodar',
             'Kursk', 'Moscow', 'Nizhnij Novgorod', 'Perm', 'Rostov-on-Don', 'Saint Petersburg',
             'Sergiev Posad', 'Tula', 'Yaroslavl'])

scheduler = BackgroundScheduler()
@scheduler.scheduled_job('cron', hour=10, misfire_grace_time=30)
def update_data():
   for city in all_cities:
       update_best_breweries(city)
scheduler.start()

Table from DataFrame

get_top_russian_breweries_table(venue_city, checkins_n=250)  will accept venue_city and checkins_n generating a Bootstrap Table with the top breweries. The second parameter value, checkins_n can be changed with the slider. If the city name is not specified, the function will return top Russian breweries table.

if venue_city == None: 
      selected_df = get_top_russian_breweries(checkins_n)
else: 
      en_city = venue_city

In other case the DataFrame will be constructed from a CSV file stored in data/cities/. Since the city column still may contain different names we should apply mapping and use a lambda expression with the map() method. The lambda function will compare values in the column against keys in city_names and if there is a match, the column value will be overwritten.
For instance, if df[‘CITY’] contains “СПБ”, a frequent acronym for Saint Petersburg, the value will be replaced, while for “Воронеж” it will remain unchanged.
And last but not least, we need to remove all duplicate rows from the table, add a column with a ranking position and return the first 10 rows. These would be the most liked breweries in a selected city.

df = pd.read_csv(f'data/cities/{en_city}.csv')     
df = df.loc[df['CHECK-INS'] >= checkins_n]
df.drop_duplicates(subset=['NAME', 'CITY'], keep='first', inplace=True)  
df.insert(0, 'RANKING', list('🏆 ' + str(i) if i in [1, 2, 3] else str(i) for i in range(1, len(df) + 1)))
selected_df = df.head(10)

After all DataFrame manipulations, the function returns a simply styled Bootstrap table of top breweries.


Bootstrap table layout in DBC

table = dbc.Table.from_dataframe(selected_df, striped=False,
                                bordered=False, hover=True,
                                size='sm',
                                style={'background-color': '#ffffff',
                                       'font-family': 'Proxima Nova Regular',
                                       'text-align':'center',
                                       'fontSize': '12px'},
                                className='table borderless'
                                )

return table

Layout structure

Add a Slider and a Dropdown menu with city names in application.py

To learn more about the Dashboard layout structure, please refer to our previous guide

checkins_slider_tab_1 = dbc.CardBody(
                           dbc.FormGroup(
                               [
                                   html.H6('Number of check-ins', style={'text-align': 'center'})),
                                   dcc.Slider(
                                       id='checkin_n_tab_1',
                                       min=0,
                                       max=250,
                                       step=25,
                                       value=250,  
                                       loading_state={'is_loading': True},
                                       marks={i: i for i in list(range(0, 251, 25))}
                                   ),
                               ],
                           ),
                           style={'max-height': '80px', 
                                  'padding-top': '25px'
                                  }
                       )

top_breweries = dbc.Card(
       [
           dbc.CardBody(
               [
                   dbc.FormGroup(
                       [
                           html.H6('Filter by city', style={'text-align': 'center'}),
                           dcc.Dropdown(
                               id='city_menu',
                               options=[{'label': i, 'value': i} for i in all_cities],
                               multi=False,
                               placeholder='Select city',
                               style={'font-family': 'Proxima Nova Regular'}
                           ),
                       ],
                   ),
                   html.P(id="tab-1-content", className="card-text"),
               ],
           ),
   ],
)

We’ll also need to add a callback function to update the table by dropdown menu and slider values:

@app.callback(
   Output("tab-1-content", "children"), [Input("city_menu", "value"),
                                         Input("checkin_n_tab_1", "value")]
)
def table_content(city, checkin_n):
   return get_top_russian_breweries_table(city, checkin_n)

Tada, the main table is ready! The dashboard can be used to receive up-to-date info about best Russian breweries, beers, and its rating across different regions, and help to make a better choice for an enjoyable tasting experience.

View the code on GitHub

 No comments    262   1 y   BI-tools   bootstrap   dash   plotly   python

VIsualizing COVID-19 in Russia with Plotly

Estimated read time – 9 min

Maps are widely used in data visualization, it’s a great tool to display statistics for certain areas, regions, and cities. Before displaying the map we need to encode each region or any other administrative unit. Choropleth map gets divided into polygons and multipolygons with latitude and longitude coordinates. Plotly has a built-in solution for plotting choropleth map for America and Europe regions, however, Russia is not included yet. So we decided to use an existing GeoJSON file to map administrative regions of Russia and display the latest COVID-19 stats with Plotly.

from urllib.request import urlopen
import json
import requests
import pandas as pd
from selenium import webdriver
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup as bs
import plotly.graph_objects as go

Modifying GeoJSON

First, we need to download a public GeoJSON file with the boundaries for the Federal subjects of Russia. The file already contains some information, such as region names, but it’s still doesn’t fit the required format and missing region identifiers.

with urlopen('https://raw.githubusercontent.com/codeforamerica/click_that_hood/master/public/data/russia.geojson') as response:
    counties = json.load(response)

Besides that, there are slight differences in the namings. For example, Bashkortostan on стопкоронавирус.рф, the site we are going to scrape data from, it’s listed as “The Republic of Bashkortostan”, while in our GeoJSON file it’s simply named “Bashkortostan”. These differences should be eliminated to avoid possible confusion. Also, the names should start with a capital.

regions_republic_1 = ['Бурятия', 'Тыва', 'Адыгея', 'Татарстан', 'Марий Эл',
                      'Чувашия', 'Северная Осетия – Алания', 'Алтай',
                      'Дагестан', 'Ингушетия', 'Башкортостан']
regions_republic_2 = ['Удмуртская республика', 'Кабардино-Балкарская республика',
                      'Карачаево-Черкесская республика', 'Чеченская республика']
for k in range(len(counties['features'])):
    counties['features'][k]['id'] = k
    if counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'] in regions_republic_1:
        counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'] = 'Республика ' + counties['features'][k]['properties']['name']
    elif counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'] == 'Ханты-Мансийский автономный округ - Югра':
        counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'] = 'Ханты-Мансийский АО'
    elif counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'] in regions_republic_2:
        counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'] = counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'].title()

It’s time to create a DataFrame from the resulting GeoJSON file with the regions of Russia, we’ll take the identifiers and names.

region_id_list = []
regions_list = []
for k in range(len(counties['features'])):
    region_id_list.append(counties['features'][k]['id'])
    regions_list.append(counties['features'][k]['properties']['name'])
df_regions = pd.DataFrame()
df_regions['region_id'] = region_id_list
df_regions['region_name'] = regions_list

As a result, our DataFrame looks like the following:

Data Scraping

We need to scrape the data stored in this table:

Let’s use the Selenium library for this task. We need to navigate to the webpage and convert it into a BeautifulSoup object

driver = webdriver.Chrome()
driver.get('https://стопкоронавирус.рф/information/')
source_data = driver.page_source
soup = bs(source_data, 'lxml')

The region names are wrapped with <th> tags, while the latest data is stored in table cells, each one is defined with a <td> tag.

divs_data = soup.find_all('td')

The divs_data list should return something like this:

The data is grouped in one line, this includes both new cases and active ones. It is noticeable that each region corresponds to five values, for Moscow these are the first five, for Moscow Region the next five and so on. We can use this pattern to create five lists and populate with values according to the index. The first value will be appended to the list with active cases, the second value to the list of new ones, etc. After every five values, the index will be reset to zero.

count = 1
for td in divs_data:
    if count == 1:
        sick_list.append(int(td.text))
    elif count == 2:
        new_list.append(int(td.text))
    elif count == 3:
        cases_list.append(int(td.text))
    elif count == 4:
        healed_list.append(int(td.text))
    elif count == 5:
        died_list.append(int(td.text))
        count = 0
    count += 1

The next step is to extract the region names from the table, they are stored within the col-region class. We also need to clean up the data by eliminating extra white spaces and line breaks.

divs_region_names = soup.find_all('th', {'class':'col-region'})
region_names_list = []
for i in range(1, len(divs_region_names)):
    region_name = divs_region_names[i].text
    region_name = region_name.replace('\n', '').replace('  ', '')
    region_names_list.append(region_name)

Create a DataFrame:

df = pd.DataFrame()
df['region_name'] = region_names_list
df['sick'] = sick_list
df['new'] = new_list
df['cases'] = cases_list
df['healed'] = healed_list
df['died'] = died_list

After reviewing our data once again we detected white space under the index 10. This should be fixed immediately, otherwise, we may run into problems.

df.loc[10, 'region_name'] = df[df.region_name == 'Челябинская область '].region_name.item().strip(' ')

Finally, we can merge our DataFrame on the region_name column, so that the resulted table will include a column with region id, which is required to make a choropleth map.

df = df.merge(df_regions, on='region_name')

Creating a choropleth map with Plotly

Let’s create a new figure and pass a choroplethmapbox object to it. The geojson parameter will accept the counties variable with the GeoJSON file, assign the region_id to locations. The z parameter represents the data to be color-coded, in this example we’re passing the number of new cases for each region. Assign the region names to text. The colorscale parameter accepts lists with values ranging from 0 to 1 and RGB color codes. Here, the palette changes from green to yellow and then red, depending on the number of active cases. By passing the values stored in customdata we can change our hovertemplate.

fig = go.Figure(go.Choroplethmapbox(geojson=counties,
                           locations=df['region_id'],
                           z=df['new'],
                           text=df['region_name'],
                           colorscale=[[0, 'rgb(34, 150, 79)'],
                                       [0.2, 'rgb(249, 247, 174)'],
                                       [0.8, 'rgb(253, 172, 99)'],
                                       [1, 'rgb(212, 50, 44)']],
                           colorbar_thickness=20,
                           customdata=np.stack([df['cases'], df['died'], df['sick'], df['healed']], axis=-1),
                           hovertemplate='<b>%{text}</b>'+ '<br>' +
                                         'New cases: %{z}' + '<br>' +
                                         'Active cases: %{customdata[0]}' + '<br>' +
                                         'Deaths: %{customdata[1]}' + '<br>' +
                                         'Total cases: %{customdata[2]}' + '<br>' +
                                         'Recovered: %{customdata[3]}' +
                                         '<extra></extra>',
                           hoverinfo='text, z'))

Let’s customize the map, we will use a ready-to-go neutral template, called carto-positron. Set the parameters and display the map:
mapbox_zoom: responsible for zooming;
mapbox_center: centers the map;
marker_line_width: border width (we removed the borders by setting this parameter to 0);
margin: usually accepts 0 values to make the map wider.

fig.update_layout(mapbox_style="carto-positron",
                  mapbox_zoom=1, mapbox_center = {"lat": 66, "lon": 94})
fig.update_traces(marker_line_width=0)
fig.update_layout(margin={"r":0,"t":0,"l":0,"b":0})
fig.show()

And here is our map. According to the plot, we can say that the highest number of cases per day is happening in Moscow – 608 new cases. It’s really high compared to the other regions, and especially to Nenets Autonomous Okrug, where this number is surprisingly low.

View the code on GitHub

 No comments    1052   2020   dash   data analytics   plotly   python

Building a Plotly Dashboard with dynamic sliders in Python

Estimated read time – 2 min

Recently we discussed how to use Plotly and built a scatter plot to display the ratio between the number of reviews and the average rating for Russian Breweries registered on Untappd. Each marker on the plot has two properties, the registration period and the beer range. And today we are going to introduce you to Dash, a Python framework for building analytical web applications. First, create a new file name app.py with a get_scatter_plot(n_days, top_n) function from the previous article.

import dash
import dash_core_components as dcc
import dash_html_components as html
from get_plots import get_scatter_plot

After importing the necessary libraries we need to load CSS styles and initiate our web app:

external_stylesheets = ['https://codepen.io/chriddyp/pen/bWLwgP.css']
app = dash.Dash(__name__, external_stylesheets=external_stylesheets)

Create a dashboard structure:

app.layout = html.Div(children=[
       html.Div([
           dcc.Graph(id='fig1'),
       ]) ,
       html.Div([
           html.H6('Time period (days)'),
           dcc.Slider(
               id='slider-day1',
               min=0,
               max=100,
               step=1,
               value=30,
               marks={i: str(i) for i in range(0, 100, 10)}
           ),
           html.H6('Number of breweries from the top'),
           dcc.Slider(
               id='slider-top1',
               min=0,
               max=500,
               step=50,
               value=500,
               marks={i: str(i) for i in range(0, 500, 50)})
       ])
])

Now we have a plot and two sliders, each with its id and parameters: minimum value, maximum value, step, and initial value. Since the sliders data will be displayed in the plot we need to create a callback. Output is the first argument that displays our plot, the following Input parameters accept values on which the plot depends.

@app.callback(
   dash.dependencies.Output('fig1', 'figure'),
   [dash.dependencies.Input('slider-day1', 'value'),
    dash.dependencies.Input('slider-top1', 'value')])
def output_fig(n_days, top_n):
    get_scatter_plot(n_days, top_n)

At the end of our script we will add the following line to run our code :

if __name__ == '__main__':
   app.run_server(debug=True)

Now, whenever the script is running our local IP address will be displayed in the terminal. Let’s open it in a web browser to view our interactive dashboard, it’s updated automatically when moving the sliders.

 No comments    518   2020   dash   data analytics   plotly   python   untappd
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